Cooling dip helps beat the heat

Farmer Michael Whitehead cools off in a water trough at Laang. 090113AM13 Pictures: ANGELA MILNE, GLEN WATSON Reuden Smith, 10, of Garvoc floats at the Panmure swimming hole. 090113AM18 Beachgoers at Warrnambool’s Lady Bay beach yesterday. 090113GW25 Harvey Browne, 15, of Panmure dives into the swimming hole. 090113AM20 Michael Delaney, of Nirranda, applies sunscreen at Lady Bay. 090113GW44
HangZhou Night Net

Farmer Michael Whitehead cools off in a water trough at Laang. 090113AM13 Pictures: ANGELA MILNE, GLEN WATSON Reuden Smith, 10, of Garvoc floats at the Panmure swimming hole. 090113AM18 Beachgoers at Warrnambool’s Lady Bay beach yesterday. 090113GW25 Harvey Browne, 15, of Panmure dives into the swimming hole. 090113AM20 Michael Delaney, of Nirranda, applies sunscreen at Lady Bay. 090113GW44

AT the beach, the pool or in the shade, yesterday was all about keeping cool at any cost as the south-west sizzled through its hottest day in more than 12 months.Warrnambool residents knew they were in for their first real taste of summer, but when the mercury hit 30 degrees by 10.30am there was little doubt it was going to be a scorcher.Hundreds flocked to Lady Bay beach keen to soak up some sun and hit the water while those not lucky enough to have the day off did whatever they could to stay cool.According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the temperature soared to 38 degrees by 4pm, but the Matko Hire digital temperature display on Raglan Parade begged to differ, showing a reading of 40 degrees by 1pm.Port Fairy was officially among the hottest towns in the state yesterday according to the Bureau of Meteorology, reaching 39.3 degrees by 3.30pm.Mildura, Hopetoun, Ouyen and Nhill also reached temperatures above 39 degrees.The high temperatures prompted warnings from doctors and the Cancer Council Australia to take extra precautions in the sun and heat.Australian Medical Association Victoria president Dr Doug Travis warned people to modify their routines to avoid heat exhaustion and dehydration during hot summer days.”Listen to your body. If you feel thirsty, drink more water and if you feel tired or dizzy, rest. Don’t exercise too strenuously, particularly if your fitness levels are low,” Dr Travis said.SunSmart Program Manager Sue Heward said ultraviolet (UV) radiation was now reaching peak levels for the year and urged people to take precautions to avoid increasing their risk of skin cancer.”Skin cancer is the most preventable of all cancers,” Ms Heward said.”UV levels reach their peak between 10am and 3pm. However, it is likely UV levels will still be dangerously high outside of these times so people need to be aware sun protection is needed most of the day.”It was the hottest day in Warrnambool, Port Fairy and Mortlake since December 31, 2007, when New Year’s Eve revellers sweltered in temperatures of 40.8, 42.3 and 40.9 degrees respectively.But the record for the highest monthly temperature remains January 22, 2006, when Warrnambool and Mortlake recorded highs of 43 degrees and Port Fairy hit 42.9 degrees.Temperatures across the south-west today and the rest of the week are expected to be in the low 20s with showers forecast for Friday.Warrnambool police have called on south-west landholders not to use welders, grinders and other equipment that can omit sparks during today’s the total fire ban.

This article first appeared in Hangzhou Night Net.