Jack ready for one final dash: Teen to bow out after national title

Jack Lee, 16, of Laang is off to Mildura to contest the weekend’s Australian Junior Sedan Championship. 090113AM08 .Picture: ANGELA MILNE “I’m getting older and I’m a bit sick of the juniors because I’ve been doing it for six years.”Jack LeeA FEW flashbacks are all that spring to Jack Lee’s mind when he thinks about the first time he competed in the Australian Junior Sedan Championship.It was easy to understand why after the 16-year-old explained his first try at the title.”I went there when I was 10 in my first-ever year of racing,” he said. “I can’t remember a lot but it was at Simpson Speedway and I went there with (cousin) Simon Craven.”Jack finished with a fourth in the B-main – not bad for a 10-year-old.Fast forward six years to today where the Warrnambool youngster will make the trek to Mildura to contest the 2009 title in his Datsun Sunny. It will be his second and final Australian Junior Sedan title race.”I thought that I did it in my first year so I might as well do it in my last year,” he said.”I’m getting older and I’m a bit sick of the juniors because I’ve been doing it for six years.”Jack will be pitted against numerous competitors he met over those six years on the weekend.He nominated Adelaide’s Adrian Cottrell, who holds the Victorian, South Australian and Northern Territory titles, as the driver to beat.He will also keep an eye on Skipton’s Jimmy Gardiner and Warrnambool’s Peter Kinnear.”(To beat them) I just need to keep my head straight,” he said. “There’s something like 100 cars so I have to finish top three in all my heats to qualify.”A record-breaking 95 drivers from every state and territory will aim to be crowned national champion. About 15 south-west youngsters will head to Mildura.After the championships, Jack plans to make the transition to formula 500s.”My Dad used to race them and so did Simon,” he said. “I’ve got the car Jamie Veal raced at Laang but I haven’t driven it yet. I probably will next month.”The 24 heats of the championship will be contested on Friday evening.The final round of heats will be held on Saturday evening, before the C, B and A mains.
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Lessons on Olympic level

Athens Olympics table tennis coach Alois Rosario holds South West Sports Academy students spellbound at yesterday’s coaching clinic. 090113GW02 Picture: GLEN WATSONATHENS Olympic table tennis team coach Alois Rosario is helping talented young Warrnambool and Hamilton players take their skills to competitions in Melbourne.Rosario has been working with nine students from the South West Sports Academy since July last year.The students will compete in five tournaments in Melbourne over the next 12 months and Rosario hopes some will be in the running for state selection.”I’ve seen huge improvements in the kids since July,” Rosario said.”To be able to source players from regional areas is really important. Until now table tennis had been missing out on the talent in regional areas of Victoria”Warrnambool Table Tennis Club president Mark Taylor said an academy-run coaching program for adults was crucial to sustaining table tennis in the region.”Currently there are only three coaches in the region,” Taylor said. “We hope this program will lift that number to 13.”For Warrnambool player Emma Manderson, Rosario’s visit meant the chance to do a lot of hard training and fix technical problems in her serving and hitting.Emma, who has been playing table tennis for two years, said the program would give her the opportunity to advance to higher levels of competition.”I’d like to try for the state junior team in the next few years,” the 14-year-old said. Taylor said the program provided regional players like Emma with a pathway to competing in the city. “Table tennis is often viewed as a hobby, rather than a sport. We want to show regional kids it is possible to reach the highest level possible in the sport.”
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South-west feels squeeze as job ads fall

“And it’s common knowledge now that more and more people are deciding to go on holiday at home,” Mr Ratcliffe said.ANZ economist Riki Polygenis said the number of internet and newspaper job advertisements nationwide had fallen sharply in December – the eighth consecutive month of decline. The annual growth rate for newspaper job advertising is 51.8 per cent, the weakest since December 1982.”This suggests we will see further significant deterioration in the labour market and this means a rise in unemployment,” Ms Polygenis said.ANZ head of economics Warren Hogan said the survey provided further evidence that demand for new labour across Australia was now at recession levels. “ANZ is forecasting the unemployment rate to rise to six per cent in 2009, up from the current rate of 4.4 per cent,” he said. “Newspaper job advertising has slumped since the intensification of the financial crisis in mid-September last year, having declined by more than 30 per cent over the course of the final three months of 2008.”Mr Hogan said despite a rise in unemployment, Australia remained in a relatively strong financial position compared to the periods of previous recessions.
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Mortlake mourns its ‘unofficial mayor’

Harry Stanbury 070425AM18 2HARRY STANBURY 1923 – 2009MORTLAKE has lost one of its leading community and sports leaders.Former president of the town’s football club, cricket club and racecourse committee, Harry Stanbury died last week aged 85 after a short illness.Born the son of Mortlake farmer Edgar Stanbury and his wife in February 1923, Mr Stanbury was considered the “unofficial mayor” of Mortlake through his work with the town’s sporting clubs as well as local branches of Legacy and the RSL.Like many of his generation, Mr Stanbury enlisted in the armed forces during World War II, serving in New Guinea for two years.Mr Stanbury told The Standard in 2007 that the opportunity of adventure and the chance to follow in the footsteps of his father, a WWI veteran, inspired him to serve his country “We were all frightened though we probably didn’t admit that. But we had to stay together. If one was in trouble then we were all in trouble,” he said at the time,” Mr Stanbury said at the time.Former Mortlake Football Club player Jim Bell said Mr Stanbury was a guiding force behind the club’s golden era of the 1960s.”Harry was president during the time I played and his dedication to Mortlake Football Club was legendary,” he said. “He was on every bus trip that we took to away games and he never missed an opportunity to get the whole team singing. “He was a real character.” Former Mortlake Racing Club president Geoff McDonald said Mr Stanbury’s dedication to voluntary work around the town never wavered.”He wasn’t a keen racing man, but his house was in close proximity to the racecourse and he never missed an opportunity to help out in some way,” he said.”Anyone that has lived in the area over the past 50 years would agree – if there was anyone who would take the title as the unofficial mayor of Mortlake, it would be Harry Stanbury.”Mr Stanbury is survived by his wife Audrey, daughter Louise and three grandsons. His funeral will be held today in Merimbula.
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Cooling dip helps beat the heat

Farmer Michael Whitehead cools off in a water trough at Laang. 090113AM13 Pictures: ANGELA MILNE, GLEN WATSON Reuden Smith, 10, of Garvoc floats at the Panmure swimming hole. 090113AM18 Beachgoers at Warrnambool’s Lady Bay beach yesterday. 090113GW25 Harvey Browne, 15, of Panmure dives into the swimming hole. 090113AM20 Michael Delaney, of Nirranda, applies sunscreen at Lady Bay. 090113GW44
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Farmer Michael Whitehead cools off in a water trough at Laang. 090113AM13 Pictures: ANGELA MILNE, GLEN WATSON Reuden Smith, 10, of Garvoc floats at the Panmure swimming hole. 090113AM18 Beachgoers at Warrnambool’s Lady Bay beach yesterday. 090113GW25 Harvey Browne, 15, of Panmure dives into the swimming hole. 090113AM20 Michael Delaney, of Nirranda, applies sunscreen at Lady Bay. 090113GW44

AT the beach, the pool or in the shade, yesterday was all about keeping cool at any cost as the south-west sizzled through its hottest day in more than 12 months.Warrnambool residents knew they were in for their first real taste of summer, but when the mercury hit 30 degrees by 10.30am there was little doubt it was going to be a scorcher.Hundreds flocked to Lady Bay beach keen to soak up some sun and hit the water while those not lucky enough to have the day off did whatever they could to stay cool.According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the temperature soared to 38 degrees by 4pm, but the Matko Hire digital temperature display on Raglan Parade begged to differ, showing a reading of 40 degrees by 1pm.Port Fairy was officially among the hottest towns in the state yesterday according to the Bureau of Meteorology, reaching 39.3 degrees by 3.30pm.Mildura, Hopetoun, Ouyen and Nhill also reached temperatures above 39 degrees.The high temperatures prompted warnings from doctors and the Cancer Council Australia to take extra precautions in the sun and heat.Australian Medical Association Victoria president Dr Doug Travis warned people to modify their routines to avoid heat exhaustion and dehydration during hot summer days.”Listen to your body. If you feel thirsty, drink more water and if you feel tired or dizzy, rest. Don’t exercise too strenuously, particularly if your fitness levels are low,” Dr Travis said.SunSmart Program Manager Sue Heward said ultraviolet (UV) radiation was now reaching peak levels for the year and urged people to take precautions to avoid increasing their risk of skin cancer.”Skin cancer is the most preventable of all cancers,” Ms Heward said.”UV levels reach their peak between 10am and 3pm. However, it is likely UV levels will still be dangerously high outside of these times so people need to be aware sun protection is needed most of the day.”It was the hottest day in Warrnambool, Port Fairy and Mortlake since December 31, 2007, when New Year’s Eve revellers sweltered in temperatures of 40.8, 42.3 and 40.9 degrees respectively.But the record for the highest monthly temperature remains January 22, 2006, when Warrnambool and Mortlake recorded highs of 43 degrees and Port Fairy hit 42.9 degrees.Temperatures across the south-west today and the rest of the week are expected to be in the low 20s with showers forecast for Friday.Warrnambool police have called on south-west landholders not to use welders, grinders and other equipment that can omit sparks during today’s the total fire ban.

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Sting uncovers prescription drug thefts

A WARRNAMBOOL delivery driver who stole opium-based tablets from his van while delivering to pharmacies was yesterday ordered to do community work.Troy Cannon, 36, of Howard Street, pleaded guilty to attempted theft, possessing a drug of dependence, using a drug of dependence and five counts of theft.Warrnambool Magistrates Court heard that Cannon was a delivery driver to pharmacies for about eight months.Police alleged that Cannon stole or attempted to steal prescription drugs MS Contin and Oxycontin six times between October 29 and November 18 last year.A Port Fairy pharmacy reported drugs missing which led to Warrnambool police detectives launching a sting operation. Boxes of drugs were marked and Cannon’s activities filmed.Cannon told police he stole the prescription drugs for his own use and injected them every couple of days.Defence counsel Amanda Chambers said prescription drugs were a significant problem in the community.She said it was inevitable that Cannon’s activities were detected.Ms Chambers said he had previously used the drugs for back and neck injuries and started using the drugs again without a prescription after falling in with the wrong crowd.Magistrate Michael Stone said Cannon had been engaged by his employer to deliver goods and his offending was a gross breach of trust. He said Cannon’s first offence may have been opportunistic but then stealing became a habit.Mr Stone said it was serious offending and opiate-based drugs were in high demand among some sections of the community.Mr Stone said people who stole drugs generally faced a prison term.Cannon was jailed for three months but the prison term was suspended for 12 months. He was also ordered to do 60 hours community work as part of a 12-month community-based order.
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Teen drug racket reaps $15,000

A TEENAGER who ran a $15,000 drug trafficking operation in Warrnambool has been placed on a 12-month youth supervision order.The youth, who cannot be named for legal reasons, appeared in a court yesterday pleading guilty to trafficking cannabis.A court heard yesterday that the youth was arrested by police in Whitehead Court, Warrnambool, as he was wanted on two warrants.He was placed in the back of a divisional van and was observed by police transferring a concealed envelope from his jacket to his left sock. The envelope was later found to contain $1800 cash.The male teenager initially told police he earned the money labouring and working for cash-in-hand. He later made admissions that he had been trafficking cannabis for three months.The youth admitted buying marijuana and doubling the price, selling to about three people daily. The male teenager told police he used mobile phone text messages to undertake his dealings.He used the money had made to buy clothes and food and to fund his social life.The youth told police he only used a small amount of the drugs himself.A defence solicitor said it was fortunate that the youth was not having the case heard in the magistrates court as he would have risked being sent to prison.A magistrate said the community was concerned about the amount of drugs available on the streets and the youth had been motivated by greed.The youth was also caught with a 40cm-long double-edged sword in February last year along with a metal baseball bat, balaclava and police scanner.In May 2007 he was also caught under-age drinking.The youth was ordered to undertake a 12-month youth supervision order with conditions he undertake treatment and counselling as required.
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Jeff pegs top idea: New take on old design

Former Warrnambool resident Jeff Scimonello with his Bluescrew pegs.WHEN Jeff Scimonello shared family camping holidays at the Warrnambool foreshore he was annoyed when tent pegs failed to hold against the wind.Years later after moving from his Warrnambool home town the idea for designing a better tent anchor began to take shape.Now the Sunshine Coast engineer is marketing his helix screw-in pegs from shop shelves in Australia and overseas.When he returned home to visit his parents, Paul and Shirley Scimonello, for Christmas he took a sample back to the same caravan park he enjoyed in his youth.”I showed manager Alby Lewis who was fascinated with the design,” Mr Scimonello, 42, said.”The idea for a screw-in peg came when I was at Ballarat Uni. It stayed in my head for about 20 years until I started designing it with injection moulding.”Through trial and error I developed the product and called it Bluescrew.”It can be used as a tent fastener, a boat anchor and a dog tether. “You don’t need tools to put it in and it holds fast under water.”We also have other products for boating and camping ready to go to market.”
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Union says movie extras should have been paid

A UNION representing actors has revealed more than 100 south-west extras in Paul Hogan and Shane Jacobson’s film Charlie and Boots should have been paid $127.28 each per day.The Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance will investigate why the extras were not paid the Actors Feature Film Agreement award rate.The Standard understands more than 100 south-west extras completed a total of about 250 days work at Warrnambool and Terang in November last year. Yesterday the producers said they were not required to pay extras because they were used to “authenticate” Warrnambool. At the award rate, the extras would have cost the producers nearly $32,000. Instead the extras agreed to work for free on the premise donations would be made to local clubs. It was revealed late last week that the South Warrnambool Football Netball Club, which hosted the auditions in October, was the sole beneficiary of a $500 donation.Alliance spokesman Jonathan Este said it was important performers were paid for their work under the act.”It is important that the deal is observed and honoured,” he said.That is a view shared by former Flagstaff Hill director Peter Ronald, who was an extra in Quigley Down Under along with his late son Lee. It was filmed in Warrnambool in 1989-90.Mr Ronald said he recalled them being paid $500 each.Mr Ronald said on top of his personal income for being an extra, the producers of Quigley Down Under donated $10,000 to Flagstaff Hill for the use of the facility for filming.He said the producers of Charlie and Boots would be “pretty game” to show their faces in Warrnambool again.”I think it is shocking,” he said.”To imply generosity via donations to clubs and then give $500 to one footy club because it hosted the auditions…I think we’ve been had.”Charlie and Boots follows the story of a Warrnambool father and son who set off on a road strep to Cape York. Producer Shana Levine said the moviemakers wanted to show both places and the people who lived in them as authentically as possible.”According to the relevant industry agreement, filmmakers can invite members of the public for the purposes of authenticity to join in scenes as extras and such members of the public are not considered the same as professional extras and are not required to be paid,” she said.”The South Warrnambool Football and Netball Club was given a small donation to thank them for their amazing efforts in helping co-ordinate the large number of local people who wanted to be involved.”
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Golden performance: Colts win fourth title in a row

Warrnambool Gold celebrates winning the shield in grand style. Pictures: WIMMERA MAIL-TIMES Michael Threlfall Warrnambool Gold celebrates winning the shield in grand style. Pictures: WIMMERA MAIL-TIMES Michael Threlfall
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WARRNAMBOOL added a stylish flourish to its fourth successive Horsham Under 15 Colts Country Week title yesterday at Coghlan Park.A chanceless century to opening batsman Louis Herbert and 75 from Player Of The Week Michael Threlfall enabled Warrnambool Gold to post a winning score of 3-234 against Mount Gambier.Louis batted through the innings to finish unbeaten on 114, peppering his innings with 13 boundaries and contributing to a 167-run second-wicket partnership with his captain.Mount Gambier was dismissed for 185, with opening bowler Jonty Tobias (4-28) and the leg spin of Louis (2-20) claiming the bulk of the wickets.As well as claiming the shield with its unbeaten campaign, Gold also snared the major individual award with Michael named Player Of The Week for his aggregate 332 runs.Coach David Ryan said the skipper set the competitive tone for Gold’s carnival when he made an unbeaten 152 on the opening day.”He set the pace early in the week and every game when we needed something he stood up and led from the front,” Ryan said.”We had 13 fantastic guys. Everyone chipped in and played their part.”All you ask for is 100 per cent and that’s what they gave me every day.”Ryan said Louis played a controlled innings, with glimpses of power, for his century yesterday.”He’s not a big hitter, just a very talented timer of the ball.”Warrnambool Blue also finished the week on a high with a big win against Hamilton.Led by 116 from opening batsman Nick Butters and 42 from Travis Monk, Blue made 5-264 then restricted Hamilton to 5-124. Sam Murrihy was the leading wicket-taker for the winners with 3-12 off 10 overs.

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